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GET HELP TODAY

Toll Free :
888-858-5404
Local :
850-391-2884

Experienced And Effective

We are a board-certified consumer bankruptcy attorney and a lawyer with over 30 years of experience in the areas of consumer rights and criminal defense. Together, we help people in Florida’s Panhandle keep their homes, find long term debt relief, fight criminal charges and develop estate plans that will benefit them and their loved ones.

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Evidence in criminal defense cases

| Feb 25, 2020 | Criminal Defense |

Navigating the criminal judicial system can be incredibly complex and very nerve wracking. Many people who are facing criminal charges might find themselves in a state of anxiety and depend purely on their attorneys to get through the process. It is important to provide as much evidence is needed to better aid your lawyer in your case. Knowing what types of evidence and how this works in a court of law is important to know.

Types of evidence:                

Generally, there are three types of evidence that can be offered in a courtroom:

  1. Testimonial evidence
  2. Physical evidence
  3. Demonstrative evidence

The credibility of the evidence will depend on how its veracity is being considered. The best way to test this is through hearsay. However, there can be instances when a defense attorney can choose to withhold evidence when he or she believes that the plaintiff did not prove its arguments. This rarely happens but, typically, the defendant has to present evidence in the courtroom.

Hearsay:

It is an out of court statement offered in a court of law to prove the truth of the mattered asserted. This can be very complex to understand but essential when it comes to disproving evidence in the courtroom. For example, if a witness takes the stand and claims that he did not personally witness the robbery but, rather, was told by his neighbor, then this type of evidence can be discarded. This is considered a secondhand suspect and his or her testimony cannot be taken seriously.

Knowing this information can shed some light on the criminal judicial system and how evidence plays a huge role in the outcome of the case.